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Gulfstream G-II Specs and Description


Gulfstream G-2 specification

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The Gulfstream II (G-II or G-2) is an American twin engine business jet originally designed by Grumman. It was then continued by Grumman American and finally Gulfstream American. The first Gulfstream II flew in October of 1966. Its Grumman model number is G-1159 and its US military designation is C-11 Gulfstream II. It has since been succeeded by the Gulfstream III (G-3). The G-II was designed as a corporate transport that provides high speed and long range capability without sacrificing the advantages that the Gulfstream I had, which were: airport performance, reliability, and other operational advantages.

The G-II has a capacity of 19 passengers and a crew of 2. It weighs in at 65,500 pounds, with a height of 24 feet, a wingspan of 68 feet, and a length of 79 feet. It is powered by two Rolls-Royce Spey RB. 168 Mk 511-8 turbofan engines and performs at a maximum speed of 581 mph (Mach 0.85) with a range of 4,123 miles. In terms of design, the wings were influenced by both cruise and low speed considerations, and the aft-mounted engine location was selected after special consideration for aerodynamic, structural, and ground clearance requirements. The airfoils for the main area of the wing are similar to the Grumman A-6 Intruder aircraft and utilize NASA 6-series thickness distributions. Other features are the wing contours, which take into consideration the aircraft’s low speed requirements by making the leading edge radius to preclude leading edge separation.

The G-II has been operated by militaries from many different countries, including: Gabon, Libya, Morroco, Nigeria, Oman, Panama, Venezuela, and the United States (NASA, US Army, US Coast Guard). It is also operated by civil operators and other private individuals, companies, and non-government organizations. Today, the Gulfstream-II has been succeeded and is no longer in service, making its final flight in September of 2012 to the Carolinas Aviation Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina.


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