The introduction of the turbojet engine brought about a revolution in the operating capabilities of many aircraft. Producing more power, faster speed, and higher fuel efficiency, turbojet engines became the staple for commercial and military aircraft. The turbojet is equally complex as it is impressive, but anybody with an interest in aviation should take the time to understand the fundamentals of these machines. In this blog, we will discuss the operating principle behind turbojets while also highlighting the various forms that may be found in standard aircraft.


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Whether you are flying a simplistic trainer aircraft or a robust military fighter jet, most modern aircraft rely on the combustion of fuel and air to create the power necessary for flight. Fuel combustion takes place in the engine of the aircraft, making it an essential element for aviation. While there are a diverse set of engines that exist for varying types of planes, most share a standard set of components that work together to make fuel combustion possible. In this blog, we will provide a brief overview of the most common engine components that are found in the aircraft engine.


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Propellers are aerodynamic devices that change rotary motion from an airplane engine or other related power source into propulsive force, allowing the aircraft to traverse the sky with ease. They can be fastened directly on a crankshaft of a piston engine or powered through a reduction gear box (RGB) attached to a piston or jet engine. The RGB converts the high rotation speed of the engine into the appropriate speed for propeller operation.


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One of the leading reasons aircraft incidents occur in cold weather is due to aircraft icing. Aircraft icing is defined as the coating or deposition of ice on any part of the aircraft, caused by the freezing of liquid hydrometers. Such occurrences make it hard for pilots to efficiently and safely navigate aircraft.


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In order to carry out safe and efficient flight operations, it is crucial that pilots have the ability to properly track the amount of fuel that is on board. While a vehicle such as an automobile could simply pull off a road and stop in the case that it runs out of fuel, such safe stops are not possible for aircraft due to their airborne operation and average speeds. As aircraft may vary in the amount of fuel tanks they have, the placement of their tanks, and the general design of the fuel system, fuel quantity measurement must be accurate and accommodate for the construction of the aircraft. In this blog, we will discuss fuel quantity indication systems, allowing you to better understand how they are designed and how they function.


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Auxiliary power units (APUs) are specialized devices installed in vehicles to provide energy for various functions. Found in large aircraft, naval ships, and large land vehicles, APUs allow them to operate autonomously without the need for GSE such as ground power units, external air-conditioning units, or high-pressure air start carts. That being said, this blog will cover APUs, how they work, and their importance.


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For an aircraft to remain airworthy and safe to operate, it must meet stringent quality guidelines and regulations that focus on part conditions, maintenance, and approval. To prevent damage to various parts and systems and their subsequent failure, aircraft engineers take advantage of a process known as heat treatment. Generally, this process will cover a wide variety of parts ranging from landing gear components to the individual bearings and joints of assemblies, ensuring that they all perform with high reliability and integrity. In this blog, we will discuss the heat treatment of aircraft components, allowing you to better understand how such processes are carried out for a number of items.


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Reciprocating aircraft engines are almost always fitted with independent, dual ignition systems, allowing for increased safety in terms of redundancy in the case of a system failure. With dual magneto configurations, the engine can even continue to run in the instance of the electrical system failing. As a result, new technology often continues this sense of redundancy, always ensuring that there is some form of backup to keep the engine running during a standard flight operation. In this blog, we will discuss the operations of a piston engine and the importance of spark plugs, allowing you to better understand how such systems function and are maintained.


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Fundamentally one of the most “hands-on” locations in aircraft, cockpits centralize compulsory flight controls that enable movement of a vehicle—sharing a resemblance to sitting in the driver's seat of a car. A typical sight unanimous within aircraft, the cockpit, or flight deck, is also known as one of the most overwhelming regions for its abundance of flight control switches and various operational equipment. Situated at the front of the vehicle to promote visibility, the cockpit centralizes crucial equipment needed for flight, ensuring a pilot always has an optimal angle to interact with devices while in the air. Diving into the basics of what composes a cockpit, we will summarize key controls used by pilots in such a location and how they aid in safely navigating an aircraft from taxiing to touchdown.


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Piston engine technology has a long history for automobiles and aircraft engine assemblies, ensuring the generation of thrust and propulsion through the combustion of fuel-and-air mixtures. Since their inception, various piston engine types have come about for aircraft and automobiles, examples being in-line, rotary, V-type, radial, and horizontally opposed engines. The opposed piston engine in particular is a more specialized type, featuring cylinders that have a piston on both ends and a lack of a cylinder head.


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